A culinary exploration of Denver’s history

How the gold rush helped shape the city’s restaurant scene

Clarke Reader
Posted 10/3/18

Not everyone can say they achieved a dream they had while in high school. But local wine expert and blogger Simone FM Spinner did just that with the publication of her first book, “Denver Food: A …

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A culinary exploration of Denver’s history

How the gold rush helped shape the city’s restaurant scene

Posted

Not everyone can say they achieved a dream they had while in high school. But local wine expert and blogger Simone FM Spinner did just that with the publication of her first book, “Denver Food: A Culinary Evolution.”

“Becoming a published book author has been a goal since I was 15 years old — and I finally did it,” she said. “I love food, cooking and dining out. Working in the wine industry, I have always been lucky to dine out frequently as a part of my work, often in the latest, hottest, most interesting restaurants in the city.”

In her book, Simone explores how German, Japanese, Chinese and Italian immigrants made their way to Colorado as part of the gold rush.

Soon they were opening up saloons, which later turned into a booming restaurant industry.

However, all the recent growth in metro area is causing some of the city’s most unique and historic locations to shut down — a trend that partly inspired Simone to start writing.

“My book is essentially a love letter to the city that I fell in love with, which doesn’t really exist anymore,” she explained. “Yet, it is also a glimpse of the future and of the amazing things that are happening right now in Denver.”

There’s a lot to know about the culinary scene in Denver, and Simone hopes readers come away understanding there’s a lot of collaboration and community between chefs.

She also wants readers to know the Denver culinary community is actively doing its part to stave off waste, food insecurity and hunger — in their restaurants and communities.

Most importantly, Simone wants readers to understand how many great tastes and flavors there are to explore right at their fingertips.

“Denver has long been ignored by food writers, influencers and critics. People assume that Denver is just about steaks, Mexican food and novelty food,” she said. “Denver’s culinary scene is a bit of a sleeper. There is so much truly great food in this city and people should get out and explore a little bit. I really appreciate the immense culinary diversity in Denver.”

For more information on the book and to order a copy, visit www.arcadiapublishing.com.

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