Goodson Center boasts new sculpture

Art-on-Loan program brings stimulating works to South Suburban facilities

Posted 6/25/18

For many years, South Suburban Parks and Recreation District’s special Public Art Committee has provided recreation to stimulate the mind, not just the body — in the form of public sculpture. It …

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Goodson Center boasts new sculpture

Art-on-Loan program brings stimulating works to South Suburban facilities

Posted

For many years, South Suburban Parks and Recreation District’s special Public Art Committee has provided recreation to stimulate the mind, not just the body — in the form of public sculpture. It can catch the eye of an individual or family on the way into a recreation center to swim or invite a leisurely up-close visit — and in some cases, a pat …

The latest Art-on-Loan sculptures continue a good program which allows for public art that enriches the surroundings at the recreation centers and gives artists a place to display their work — and possibly sell it — an ongoing issue for sculptors of outdoor works …

The pat is certainly in order with Collette Pitcher’s newly placed “Within Reach,” near the tables at the entrance to the Goodson Recreation Center, 6315 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Even though it’s cast in bronze, the cuddly bear cub, “reaching for the stars to fulfill his dream,” certainly invites a gentle touch — and what better way can there be to introduce a young one to the pleasure of three-dimensional art than touching it? Perhaps there’s time to make up a name and a story on a leisurely summer day? Or settle in with a cookie and spot of tea? The little guy seems to invite company — or is he singing a Winnie-the-Pooh song about honey?.

Pitcher, who lives in Greeley, includes birdwatching, traveling and automobile racing in her life, as well as art-making. She is coordinator for the Mari Michener Gallery at the University of Northern Colorado and a member of the Greeley Creative District Board. She is the author of “Watercolor for Dummies” and “Acrylic Painting for Dummies” and earned her bachelor’s in fine art from the University of Northern Colorado, as well as an MBA from the University of Long Island, West Point, New York.

Along the road in from University Boulevard at Goodson, watch for Justin Deister’s bronze sculpture, “Sandstorm” on a pedestal. It depicts clouds floating above a rainstorm on a Western geological landscape.

The artist lives in Louisville and is the owner of Uppercase Design. His sculpture is created from metal, sandstone, plex, foam, fiberglass and paint, which offer a variety of textures and earthy colors. He earned a BFA in graphic design at Missouri State University and an MFA in communication arts and design from Virginia Commonwealth University. He also studied at the Kansas City Art Institute.

Across the entrance patio, on a tall blue pole, stands the fanciful “Air B ‘n B” by Patricia Aaron, which “offers a colorful and whimsical accommodation for small feathered travelers looking for a safe haven and respite.” It is built with powder-coated steel and acrylic panels, etched with flowers and birds from Colorado. As late afternoon sun hit it, it appeared to have colored lights glowing within.

Aaron, who lives and works in Greenwood Village, has exhibited across the U.S. and internationally. Her art is in corporate and private collections, including the close-to-home collection of the Museum Outdoor Arts in Englewood. Her MFA is from the University of Denver, where she is currently an adjunct professor.

The Public Art Committee also oversees the temporary exhibits at the recreation centers and has an ongoing program of commissioning works. Included: “Collective Nest,” by Josh Weiner includes a hawk and fish in a high-up nest at Hudson Gardens; “Balance in Motion” by John King, a kinetic piece that responds to the wind, displayed at the Littleton Golf and Tennis Club; “‘Plash,” a piece made from glass, concrete and steel, installed at the edge of the relaxing pond at Little’s Creek Park. Committee members are: Jesssica Willcox, chair; Emily Myers, vice chair; Ashley Trunnell, secretary; Larry Lovelace; Vicky Harimon; Bill Hastings; Ada Anderson; and retiring members (in July) Kyla Hammond and Al Clerihue.

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