Wool can be cool

Posted 4/17/17

Demonstrations of how wool goes from the backs of sheep to being turned into useful items were held at Littleton Museum’s 1860s farm April 15.

Events at Sheep to Shawl included sheep-herding trials, shearing the wool off of the animal, and …

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Wool can be cool

Posted

Demonstrations of how wool goes from the backs of sheep to being turned into useful items were held at Littleton Museum’s 1860s farm April 15.

Events at Sheep to Shawl included sheep-herding trials, shearing the wool off of the animal, and washing, dyeing, spinning and weaving the wool.

Seven-year-old border collie Gibbs, led by Kathleen Holland of Fort Collins, put on a display of his herding prowess in the sheepdog trials.

“He started trialing when he was about 1,” Holland said.

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