Baker district tour quenches curiosity

Six houses, a church, a former theater and a school among those on display

Staff report
Posted 8/8/19

The Historic Baker District once again will be opening its doors to the public this summer. The annual Baker Home Tour on Aug. 24 features six homes of various architectural styles, a former …

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Baker district tour quenches curiosity

Six houses, a church, a former theater and a school among those on display

Posted

The Historic Baker District once again will be opening its doors to the public this summer.

The annual Baker Home Tour on Aug. 24 features six homes of various architectural styles, a former theater-turned-distillery, a neighborhood church, and a Neo-Gothic school. Proceeds support the Baker Historic Neighborhood Association with a portion donated to DCIS at Fairmont and other community programs.

Denver’s historic heart is well known for the many mansions lining its streets. Many of the city’s famous architectural treasures survived modernization owing to preservation efforts — the Molly Brown House serving as the quintessential example.

However, these popular grand residences of Denver’s wealthy elite often overshadow the often-lesser known but just as compelling stories behind the homes of the middle class at the turn of the century. This year’s tour casts a spotlight on these more obscure gems and offers a rare glimpse into what life was like for the rest of us.

Baker witnessed its beginnings in 1872 when Denver expanded residential development southward to accommodate its swelling population. It is unique among Denver’s neighborhoods, boasting the largest concentration of Queen Anne Victorian homes in the city’s historic center.

Any passerby can quickly recognize this style by its ornate exteriors, fairytale turrets and decorative balconies. Several homes on the tour showcase these characteristic details, though examples of other architectural periods are also represented. A featured home this year is a large Victorian mansion, which was completely renovated in early 2019.

Another classic home’s interior can be described as “living in art” given the owners’ hand crafted artistic embellishments throughout.

The tour lasts from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets cost $20 in advance or $25 on the day of the tour. For tickets and information, go to bakerhometour.com.

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