My Name Is ... Herb Goede

Don't mistake his Rolls-Royce for a hot rod

Posted 8/19/19

The taxman cometh I'm a dad and a husband first. I run an IT development shop for FISERV. The main company does credit card processing, but I work for a division that develops and maintains the …

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My Name Is ... Herb Goede

Don't mistake his Rolls-Royce for a hot rod

Posted

The taxman cometh

I'm a dad and a husband first.

I run an IT development shop for FISERV. The main company does credit card processing, but I work for a division that develops and maintains the applications you pay your taxes with. Turbotax and other tax filing software services funnel into our system, and we standardize it to send to the IRS.

We process a little over $3 trillion a year. It's a high-pressure environment. There's no room for error. During quarterly and annual tax filing season, the system has to run fast and smooth. Big companies use our software, and a screw-up can have far-reaching consequences. You know if something goes wrong, it'll make the newspapers.

Cars from across the pond

I love old cars. I got my first British car when I was 14. It's an Austin Healey Sprite, and I still own it. My dad and I took it out of a junkyard, fixed it up, and that's what I drove in high school.

I've got three other British cars, but I love my 1925 Rolls-Royce. I bought it from my uncle, who lives in Devonshire, England. He was a self-made millionaire who owned a chain of auto parts stores. His shoulders got arthritic, and he couldn't crank the steering wheel in these old cars anymore — there was no such thing as power steering when they made these.

He sold it to me for a song. He had it shipped to me by boat through the Panama Canal to California, then to Colorado.

Slow going

My Rolls-Royce doesn't even have as much power as a Honda Civic — it's got about 20 horsepower, so it's really slow. Some people in traffic nearly hit the car trying to look at it, and others honk their horns at me because I'm not going fast enough.

I tune it up myself, but it doesn't get driven that much. I take it to car shows, or I take my family to Dairy Queen in it on weekends. Sometimes my neighbor's kids want to go for a ride. My son and I like to work on my cars together, and I never get tired of that.

If you have suggestions for My Name Is, please contact David Gilbert at dgilbert@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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